The Sound of Things to Come

Nigerian Novel Is the Vanguard of a New Generation of African Writers

The Sound of Things to Come by Emmanuel Iduma

A young woman loses her grip on reality, destroyed by being the mistress of a powerful general. A pastor hides the innocent from marauding gangs hyped up by post-election fervor. A philosophy professor struggles against his better judgment to save everyone but himself. In present day Nigeria, there are many centers of the universe.

 

Told from various points of view, The Sound of Things to Come departs from the strictures of linear narratives. Loosely centered on the activities of a church, the many colorfully drawn characters in Emmanuel Iduma’s breakthrough novel illuminate the complex interconnectedness of a community where individuals struggle through their own painful dramas.
 

First published in 2012 as Farad in Nigeria, Iduma’s novel is the disruptive harbinger of Nigeria's rising generation of writers.
 

“Iduma deploys a meta-psychological technique where his characters are dissected for both experiences and motives,” says award-winning poet Dami Ajayi about The Sound of Things to Come. “The innards of his characters are exhibited as though for contemplation…And in spite of this experimental foray, their humanity is left intact.”

 

Purchase The Sound of Things to Come directly from The Mantle | your local bookstore | KindleAmazon | Kobo | Ingram | SPD

 

The Sound of Things to Come
October 2016
216 pages
paperback ($15.00) and Kindle ($9.99)
literature | experimental fiction  
5.5" x 8.5" 
978-0-9965770-9-0

 

Art for the cover by Victor Ehikhamenor (Nigeria). Book jacket design by Tijana Cvetkovic. Interior design by Susan Leonard.

 

CONTACT: Shaun Randol, shaun [at] themantle.com

 

Praise

Iduma’s prose is always fresh and illuminating. Intelligent, haunting and evocative, The Sound of Things to Come marks him as a unique talent to watch. —Ayobami Adebayo, Stay With Me 

 

In The Sound of Things to Come Emmanuel Iduma deploys a meta-psychological technique where his characters are dissected for both experiences and motives. The innards of his characters are exhibited as though for contemplation…And in spite of this experimental foray, their humanity is left intact. —Dami Ajayi, Clinical Blues

 

The Sound of Things to Come, Emmanuel Iduma's formally adventurous and uncommonly sophisticated debut, seduces us into becoming witnesses to the quiet desperation in the lives of a diverse cast of sympathetically drawn characters. The gradual revelation of the connections between these disparate lives illuminates the unpredictable workings of our common humanity and compels us to confront our shared vulnerabilities. The Sound of Things to Come privileges the road less travelled in its aesthetic choices. It is an essential read for anyone interested in unconventional fictional investigations of contemporary experience. —Rotimi Babatunde, winner of the Caine Prize for African Writing, 2012

 

Like an expert charmer, Emmanuel Iduma strings the reader along with delectable character portraits, building anticipation until the last page. The Sound of Things to Come announces the arrival of another talented writer. —Abubakar Adam Ibrahim, author of The Whispering Trees and Caine Prize nominee

 

Reviews & Publicity 

Reviewed by The African Book Review

Read an excerpt on Global Literature in Libraries Initiative 

Reviewed in World Literature Today 

Interviewed at AfriDiaspora

Reviewed at AfriDiaspora

Emmanuel named to 100 Most Influential Writers Under 40 list

Emmanuel is interviewed by Adebiyi Olusolape for Enkrare Review 

Reviewed at Bakwa Magazine 

Emmanuel is interviewed by Yinka Elujoba for World Literature Today 

Read an excerpt from the novel on Enkare Review 

For The Mantle: Writer's Notes: Emmanuel Iduma Recalls How Elements of His Novel Appeared to Him 

 

 

About the Author

Emmanuel Iduma​ was born and raised in Nigeria, where he trained as a lawyer. He received an MFA in art criticism and writing from the School of Visual Arts, New York. He is a co-founder of Saraba Magazine and co-editor of Gambit: Newer African Writing.