Solving a Cliffhanger - With Your Generous Support

Reportage

 

This year marks the 20th anniversary since South Africa's first democratic elections, which in 1994 drove the final nail into the coffin of Apartheid. To commemorate this event and measure the depth of racial healing between blacks and whites in "The New South Africa," longtime Mantle correspondent Michael J. Jordan launched a documentary-film project, The Clubhouse: A Post-Apartheid Story. Below is Part 6 of his six-part travelogue from his recent production trip, on the making of this film.

 

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 I thank Derrick for his time, with sincere gratitude.

 

Getting him to say as much as he just did is a minor coup.

 

Honestly, I don’t know if Derrick was already planning to clear the air with Samuel—and even apologize. Or, after I presented him a noble path forward, he pounced on it like a life-preserver. Have I shaped the story? Time will tell. But if my outsider-influence nurtures progress, I can live with that consequence. (Could you?)

 

Moreover, it now dawns on me. Not only is The Clubhouse drilling deeper into the core of inter-communal relations within this one infamous farming town—and extracting some illuminating evidence of racial healing and black empowerment.

 

Now, thanks to Derrick’s angry slip of the tongue, we have a cliff-hanger, too.

 

Will they? … Or won’t they?

 

Will the Golf Club investigate the incident? And mete out tough punishment?

 

Will Derrick offer an apology? Will he do so willingly? Or unwillingly? 

 

Even then, will Sam accept it? Will he be placated by how Club leaders deal with this nasty episode? Or, disgruntled, will he make good on his threat – and quit?

Likewise, if Charles is disappointed by his colleagues’ verdict, will he also quit?

 

Lastly, the folks of Ventersdorp: black and white, how will they react to all this?

 

Stay tuned, dear supporters! …

 

Wait, hold on. Don’t just stay tuned! Please, donate now to our Indiegogo campaign, to sponsor our return to Ventersdorp—to  film this final chapter of The Clubhouse. It’s much more than a golf story, as it opens a window onto a people we should all pull for: South Africans, twenty years after Apartheid.

 

Despite their exasperation with crime, corruption and cronyism—and the media focus on all that’s gone wrong since 1994—our film reveals ordinary South Africans striding to fulfill Nelson Mandela’s wish for a harmonious Rainbow Nation.

 

Just as golf has its rules of etiquette, so, too, does a democratic society. And for a multi-racial, multi-ethnic, multi-lingual country like South Africa to live in harmony, a majority of society must embrace the concept of mutual civility and respect.

 

Yet when there’s a breach of that etiquette, a black South African like Samuel not only recognizes his rights, but now feels empowered to loudly defend those rights. Even more, he expects—no, demands—that white Club leaders deliver justice.

 

For all this to happen in a town as notorious as Ventersdorp, it’s a testament to how far The New South Africa has truly come—twenty years after Apartheid.

 

If you help us tell this meaningful story, we’ll forever enshrine you and your contribution—eternally, among our film’s credits, and on our website. Plus, I’ll send you a token of our appreciation: a coffee-mug or t-shirt stamped with our artsy logo!

 

Thank you, in advance, for your support.

 

 

Follow Michael on Twitter @mjjordanink 

 

 

Apartheid, South Africa